Project Scope

The initial focus for this project will be in understanding and designing a circuit able to transmit a wireless signal with a low input voltage. Using a blog article on a simple scavenger ring as a starting point, it will be the team’s responsibility to analysis, modify and improve on the basic functioning ring that was created. This will be achieved by extensive use of literature and other research to create a much more extensive and functioning circuit which has been designed with a more comprehensive level of examination. Once completed, a secondary circuit will need to be designed to harvest a particular source of energy to power the circuit. The options available for this project include peltier, piezo electric, electromagnetic and magnetic coil. For this part of the project the optimisation and testing of the allocated energy source, used to power the sensor will be the main component of the thesis. The overall result will hopefully be a small device that can emit a signal from small amounts of energy harvested from the particular...

Use of microcontrollers and MEMS for condition monitoring.

The traditional methods for high frequency data analysis involve many piezoelectric sensors, signal amplifiers and spectrum analysers the size of a modern day desktop computer. However, with the arrival of low cost and easy to use microcontrollers and Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS), perhaps it’s time to reconsider some of the traditional methods. This blog post aims to outline some of the challenges, limitations and success encountered whilst trying to use a combination of microcontroller and MEMS devices for condition monitoring. The equipment: Arduino MEGA 2560: . The large user community along with extensive libraries available make this an ideal choice for experimentation. ADXL345: The ADXL345 is a small, thin, low power, 3-axis accelerometer with a measurement range of upto ±16 g.   Thanks to the advances in rapid prototyping, it is incredibly easy to produce PCB’s in low quantities whilst keeping cost to a minimum. We had designed and manufactured our own PCBs to support this project. The PCB houses the accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a voltage and current sensor and a various other electronics. This test setup cost us <$100.           Challenge #1: Data storage: The Arduino lacks an onboard flash storage. Therefore it requires an external storage space to store the data. An SD card shield is the simplest solution to overcome this problem. This method however, has one big disadvantage and that is the speed at which data can be written to an SD Card. Every time the Arduino has new data to be written to the SD Card, a file in the SD Card has to be opened, the data written and then closed. Failure to close it at...